Colleges, Degrees and Education

I hope my kid never goes to college. I hope he doesn’t have to. I hope that in the next 18 years, we figure out a better to learn and teach kids. I hope that one day anyone can learn anything that is being taught anywhere in the universe simply by logging in.

A lot of top colleges already offer free education online. Not receiving a diploma in exchange for what you learned isn’t the problem, society expecting one is. Perhaps we need to rethink how we perceive who is “qualified” and who is not.

How many people do we alienate because we base what they can learn and where they can learn it form on what kind of kids they were before they fully matured. 

I’m not just talking about high school grades and SATs. The dichotomy of the education system starts at a young age. We place certain kids in “gifted” programs or in “honors” programs and we place others on an education path with less expectations of those students and equally less contributions to those students. All of this happens well before high school, it happens in elementary school, before some children even develop a sense or drive for learning or a focus on a particular skill or knowledge set. 

Some people are late bloomers. They don’t figure things out and get their life in order until 20, 21, 25 years old. But for them, it’s already too late. They have 50 or 60 years of life left, but we’ve already sealed their fate. These people can’t get into better schools and they aren’t typically considered for better jobs. Not at 25, 35 or 55 years of age. We don’t view them as qualified. And we don’t give them a chance to prove it. 

I’m not saying let anyone into any school. Not right away, at least. But we need to gradually relax the acceptance program while also improving how colleges teach. 

There are people willing to pay to be taught and people willing to get paid to teach yet colleges put canyons between them. Application processes are ass-backwards. If people want to pay to learn, let them. If they flunk out, that’s their problem. 

There just seems to be this artificial divide between consumers and producers in this market and I think we can find better ways to bridge both sides without sacrificing the quality of education. 

 

YOU ARE NOT A HISTORIAN

halcyonhours:

sugashane:

oytotheworld:

YOU ARE NOT A HISTORIAN

You did not go to university to study history. The word “historiography” is a word you thought I made up. Chicago Manual/Turabian/Rampolla citation method is a foreign concept to you. You haven’t even spent a whole year studying a specific topic. You aren’t published either. You’ve read the wikipedia entry on the Dark Ages and you think you’ve got it all sorted out. So yeah, tell me how you’re a “historian” compared to me? (You are an English major. I am a History major.)

I think that if someone thinks going to college and studying something automatically makes them something special and also automatically makes them more qualified than someone else, I think that they are fucking clueless about life. 

Since you’re a history major, perhaps you should look into how people became experts before universities. Most people studied under specialists or read manuscripts or what I like to call analog wikipedia texts. 

There’s nothing I hate more than someone who thinks going to college makes them more qualified than those that didn’t. The shit they teach you in school is also found on the internet. Thank you very much. 

While I don’t think college is inherently a bad idea, much less a scam, I agree wholeheartedly. Nothing gets me more on my nerves than a functional imbecile who holds a piece of paper in higher regard than effort and experience. 

If you believe you’re more qualified to talk about a certain subject just because you spent X years taking classes on it, then I’m sorry, you’re nothing more than a despicable dolt. While college can give you valuable experience and knowledge I have no guarantee you actually had enough capacity to comprehend the full curriculum. Thousands of students graduate by cheating or memorising. They’re still college graduates. How do those pieces of shit compare to the ones who work hard or the people without a college education who have dedicated years of their life to the study of what they’re passionate about? 

Oh, and by the way, you major doesn’t define your career. You can major in English and be a historian. You can major in physics and be a sociologist. You can major in absolutely nothing and still have a career. Not only applies to business. Fucking Frank Lloyd Wright was a dropout and we all know his legacy. 

Right. I don’t discount the fact that college does have some merit and I certainly have never discounted the value of education, regardless of how it’s obtained. 

I just think the assumption of “college = knowledgeable in that subject” is a ridiculous theory. 

Bill Gates and Steve Jobs didn’t graduate college, I’d like to meet two random Computer Science majors that have more credibility than them. Heck, Jobs can school almost all marketing MBAs and the man spent a total of 6 months in a university, mostly studying calligraphy. 

(via 0227199208142014)

YOU ARE NOT A HISTORIAN

oytotheworld:

YOU ARE NOT A HISTORIAN

You did not go to university to study history. The word “historiography” is a word you thought I made up. Chicago Manual/Turabian/Rampolla citation method is a foreign concept to you. You haven’t even spent a whole year studying a specific topic. You aren’t published either. You’ve read the wikipedia entry on the Dark Ages and you think you’ve got it all sorted out. So yeah, tell me how you’re a “historian” compared to me? (You are an English major. I am a History major.)

I think that if someone thinks going to college and studying something automatically makes them something special and also automatically makes them more qualified than someone else, I think that they are fucking clueless about life. 

Since you’re a history major, perhaps you should look into how people became experts before universities. Most people studied under specialists or read manuscripts or what I like to call analog wikipedia texts. 

There’s nothing I hate more than someone who thinks going to college makes them more qualified than those that didn’t. The shit they teach you in school is also found on the internet. Thank you very much. 

newsweek:

think-progress:

#BorrowMoneyFromYourParents trending nationwide, brought to you by ThinkProgress.
Tell us your own.

The artillery in the 2012 campaign will be hashtags.

HAHHAHA. Borrow Money From Your Parents? BWHAHHAHAHA. 
Mitt Romney is CLUELESS! 
We should borrow money from banks and the gov’t (who have STOLEN IT from you parents!). Duh!
Oh, wait. Shit. 
The sad thing is that both the left and right are completely wrong about this. What’s wrong with this picture and America in general isn’t summed up in this war of words, it creates and fosters this situation. 
The issue isn’t that some people can afford to borrow from wealthy parents, or that some people have no parent-fund to borrow from. 
The issue is that we live in a society that encourages constant spending, borrowing and debt. It frowns upon savings and sound money. Poor people are told that they are better off borrowing money at 5% to 10% and sometimes as high as 30% then they are at working extra jobs, spending wisely, not buying unnecessary things for a few months and scraping the money together themselves.
Once that individual is soaked in debt, they carry it forward. They never get to build up a savings, and worse yet, they never THINK of building up a savings. Then they meet someone else who might be smart and attractive and educated, but they’re also waist deep in debt. Together, they form a new, happy family, neck deep in debt. By the time the kids grow up and are ready for school or business, there is no “parent-fund” to borrow from so the kids themselves borrow from high interest, low compassion lenders and the vicious cycle continues.  
Welcome to the American Nightmare. 
@Suga_Shane

newsweek:

think-progress:

#BorrowMoneyFromYourParents trending nationwide, brought to you by ThinkProgress.


Tell us your own.

The artillery in the 2012 campaign will be hashtags.

HAHHAHA. Borrow Money From Your Parents? BWHAHHAHAHA. 

Mitt Romney is CLUELESS! 

We should borrow money from banks and the gov’t (who have STOLEN IT from you parents!). Duh!

Oh, wait. Shit. 

The sad thing is that both the left and right are completely wrong about this. What’s wrong with this picture and America in general isn’t summed up in this war of words, it creates and fosters this situation. 

The issue isn’t that some people can afford to borrow from wealthy parents, or that some people have no parent-fund to borrow from. 

The issue is that we live in a society that encourages constant spending, borrowing and debt. It frowns upon savings and sound money. Poor people are told that they are better off borrowing money at 5% to 10% and sometimes as high as 30% then they are at working extra jobs, spending wisely, not buying unnecessary things for a few months and scraping the money together themselves.

Once that individual is soaked in debt, they carry it forward. They never get to build up a savings, and worse yet, they never THINK of building up a savings. Then they meet someone else who might be smart and attractive and educated, but they’re also waist deep in debt. Together, they form a new, happy family, neck deep in debt. By the time the kids grow up and are ready for school or business, there is no “parent-fund” to borrow from so the kids themselves borrow from high interest, low compassion lenders and the vicious cycle continues.  

Welcome to the American Nightmare. 

@Suga_Shane

Aw! Obama no longer cool with the college kids.

poorrichardsnews:

He was supposed to be a fashion icon!  A President for hipsters and cool kids!  Hope for young America! Sadly for Obama, he’s loosing his cool factor with college students.

from Bloomberg:

“There’s definitely a significant sense that this generation are more apathetic headed into the 2012 election than they were in 2008,” John Della Volpe, director of polling for Harvard University’s Institute of Politics, said in a phone interview.

Obama’s approval rating among college students dropped to 46 percent last December from 58 percent in November 2009, according to a Harvard Universitypoll. Fifty percent of people between the ages of 18 and 24 said they would “definitely” be voting, an 11 percentage-point decrease from the fall of 2007. A third of respondents said they approved of Democrats in Congress, and 24 percent approved of Republicans. Just 12 percent said the nation was headed in the right direction

“The turnout will not be great,” Curtis Gans, director of the Center for theStudy of the American ElectorateinWashington, said in a phone interview. The war inAfghanistan, a lack of progress on closing Guantanamo Bay and a dismal job picture taint Obama’s prospects, he said. The unemployment rateamong 18- to 24-year-olds was 16.3 percent at the end of last year, the highest since record-keeping began in 1948, according to aFebruary Pew Research Center report.

“There’s not the sense that four more years of Obama will change the world for the better,” Gans said. Still, Obama stands a “reasonably good chance” of winning, he said.

read the rest

Could it really be that pesky 16% unemployment number?  Or is it just the mom jeans?

Some reports say that actual unemployment numbers for 16 to 24 year old age bracket is that over 50% have no job but only 16% of what they consider the “active labor force” is unemployed.